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Tuesday, 11 January 2011

Anger management.

I've been suffering from a bad back since the start of my Christmas hols - typical, 'cos I haven't been able to get as much done as I wanted to, and that includes work in the shed. Well, I've been feeling a bit better these last few days, so I took the spare half hour I had before going to work to do a bit more to Terry's engine. You wouldn't think that one teeny weeny little innocent looking screw, could cause so much trouble. It's one of the ones that holds the cover on that you have to remove to gain access to the split pin so that the camplate pin (I read that somewhere, it could be the wrong name) can be removed - you with me? Mr Pres informs me that he sometimes uses an impact driver on them, but I never had any bother with the ones on Cubbie, so I wasn't anticipating any bother today. The first one came out, easy peasy, but the second, and indeed, the last one (why is it always the last one and not the first one?), no way was it shifting. I tried my trusty screwdriver with interchangeable bits, can usually find one that gets a good grip, but no luck, then I tried to set fire to the darned thing, don't know whether that was a terribly good idea or not, but by then both my shoulder and back were hurting. I remembered spotting an impact driver somewhere in the shed, gosh, didn't even know I had one, so I dug it out and gave it a go. Well, a thump, to be precise. But it ain't shifting. About three days ago I drenched the screws with WD40, but you can never have too much WD, so I after another soaking I chucked my screwdriver down in disgust and got ready for work. Grrrrrr.
The offending item. Looks like it'll have to be dug out with an excavator now that I've successfully chewed it up.
Oh, this'll make you laugh. I'm going to build a blasting cabinet to facilitate the cleaning up of Terry's rusty bits. I was inspired by a link that UN kindly sent me, detailing how you don't need to build a cabinet, just use a huge box of bicarbonate of soda, and because it's non-toxic, you just use it straight out of the box, outdoors, then a quick rinse with the watering can will sort out your patio. Now, that's not a bad idea, only it's usually cold and breezy outdoors in Scotland at this time of year, and I don't think bicarb is going to quite cut the rust on the wheels, so I reckon if I get a bit of perspex and some ply, build a box, cut a couple of holes in it for arms, get some thick gloves, and some sand, away we go. Anyone out there built their own cabinet? Want to send me a piccy? Please? Go on, pretty please?

12 comments:

Phill said...

Make sure you get the right blasting stuff-I believe using sand can cause silicosis and other horrors.

Lindsay said...

Drill the head off and then weld a nut to the bit of stud that is left. Use a socket and ratchet to then back out the bit that is left. If it shears the stud, no problem, you then drill the stud and use an easy out after cooking it (the bit of stud and hole in it) with a fine point blow torch.

Anonymous said...

You know, I believe your Editor- type friend built one when he was editing that other publication...you know the fellow that likes to drive over cars like you do... Hairy Larry

Bantam Cub said...

If the other screw is already out, isn't it possible to force the cover plate out and twist it round on the seized screw so you can continue dismantling with the screw still in place? Might distort the plate a little, but should be easy to straighten it later. If you do that then you get the engine apart without further delay and the screw should be much easier to deal with on the bench?

Anonymous said...

The only decent impact driver I own is a Snap-on one I've had for nearly 40 years.Somewhere I have an old "Craftsman" brand thats not too bad either. Use some "liquid wrench" or similar penetrating oil to soak it. Set the bit against the screw and drive it into the head with a small hammer. Then use your impact driver. All the cheap ones I've owned seem to have too much slop in them and you have to twist them up tight before whacking them. Or try the punch and chisel methods. I'd only drill and or weld nuts on as a last resort. We have a penetrating oil in the shops here called "Loose'n" I believe, that works about the best.Good luck. Yeah, Tim B. built a blast cabinet from some MDF that was big enough for a frame a few years back. Hairy Larry

sfb said...

Larry's right - I definitely remember a very detailed article by Tim B about how to build your own blasting cabinet. He built his from scratch but I think he also pointed out that it would be fairly easy to adapt an old piece of furniture eg a wardrobe for the purpose. I've got it somewhere.........
Be careful not to overdo it with that bad back!

Anonymous said...

I reckon Lindsay's on the right lines, and any worry about silicosis can be negated by building a box - oh, which you are! - and if you're really paranoid, wear a mask.

Bikefan said...

Try using a drift or a piece of barstock, slightly smaller than the screw head and punch it smartly with a hammer several times so that the old screwdrive sort of caves in on itself, then use a new pozi bit the same size as the original, offer it up to the screw and strike it to punch in a fresh screwdrive, this also loosens the thread so it can usually be unscrewed quite easily but an impact driver is best.
This works 9 out of 10 times and can be repeated at least once.

If the screwhead breaks off do not use an EZ out, the name should qualify as misrepresentation in the US and I'm surprised they haven't been sued:-) Usually it breaks off leaving a bit stuck in the hole 10 times harder than any drillbit known to man and is very difficult to remove. If you must drill preferrably use a drillpress and drill out the screw with a bit approximately the same size as the core diameter of the screw, done accurately the remains can be removed with a pair of tweezers and the thread freshened up with a tap, alternatively Helicoiled. This may sound like a machining operation but it's not really, for 1/4 inch screws and up it can be done with a hand drill but takes some practise.


If you have a welder one option is to just weld a blob to the head and unscrew with a visegrip, no need to drill the head off first but the punch method is faster and easier.

U N said...

I'm with Bikefan re: EZ outs. I've never seen one work, but I've seen plenty snap in the seized stud. I used to work in a place that had a spark eroder and it was used all the time for burning out broken EZ outs.
I like the idea of welding on a nut. I've welded two lengths of rod into a 'T', then welded the end of the 'T' onto the remains of a stud and twisted it out. You're looking for an excuse to use that big welder you've got, aren't you?
If it comes to drilling it out and using a Helicoil, don't panic! I've done plenty and it's fairly easy.
The website I sent to Her Gorgeousness is: http://www.garagenight.tv/diy-soda-blasting-build-your-own-rig-cheap/
Click on the link to 'Air Cooled Tech' for more details.

U N

The Chief Bodger said...

SFB and HL are right, there was an old issue of CBG that an an article about that. I've got it in the shed, if I can find it I'll scan it for ya and emaail it if you want.

Darrell said...

Ok, I'll weigh in. I'm a believer in what an instructor of mine once said: when in doubt, give it a clout.
Of course in this case, take it in the house so its warm, and soak the offending screw with a good penetrating oil, then use a good impact driver. And take your time.
(Sounds like what everyone else said, huh?)

Gorgeous Biker Chick said...

Thanks for all your suggestions, luckily I didn't have to do anything serious (like welding, cos I can't weld) but I soaked it over night with WD40 and then set fire to the darn thing this morning, and gave it another whallop for good measure. I forced a small flat bladed screwdriver bit into it and that got a grip so I was able to get more leverage on it. Bingo. Next problem...

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